Which Records Won Best Album at the Grammy Awards in the 80s?

With the 2016 Grammy Award being hosted by 80s icon L.L. Cool J, we decided to take a look back at which performers took home the biggest prizes at the show in the 80s. Some of the winners are obvious — iconic songs which we still love today. Others are more than a little bit perplexing.
 
1980:
 
Album of the Year
CHRISTOPHER CROSS, Christopher Cross

Record of the Year
CHRISTOPHER CROSS, “Sailing”

Song of the Year

CHRISTOPHER CROSS, “Sailing”

 

It was a clean sweep for Cross who would go on to pretty much never be heard from again.

 

1981:

 

Album of the Year

JOHN LENNON & YOKO ONO, Double Fantasy

 

Record of the Year

KIM CARNES, “Bette Davis Eyes”

 

Song of the Year

DONNA WEISS & JACKIE DESHANNON, “Bette Davis Eyes” (Kim Carnes)

 

It’s hard to remember that Yoko Ono once actually produced listenable music and this album is an all-time classic. “Bette Davis Eyes” by Kim Carnes may not be quite as much a classic, but it’s still surprisingly catchy.

 

1982:

 

Album of the Year

TOTO, Toto IV


Record of the Year

TOTO, “Rosanna”


Song of the Year

WAYNE CARSON, MARK JAMES & JOHNNY CHRISTOPHER,

“Always On My Mind” (Willie Nelson)

 

TOTO was a supergroup of sorts which scored a number of hits and IV was the pinnacle of its success (though a version of the group still plays now). Willie Nelson, of course, has been an icon for decades and this may be one of his most widely-known songs which truly holds up.

 

1983:

 

Album of the Year

MICHAEL JACKSON, Thriller


Record of the Year

MICHAEL JACKSON, “Beat It”


Song of the Year

STING, “Every Breath You Take”

 

This was Michael Jackson at the height of his power (well before we knew what a creep he would turn out to be) and The Police when they were the best band in the world.

 

1984:

 

Album of the Year

LIONEL RICHIE, Can’t Slow Down


Record of the Year

TINA TURNER, “What’s Love Got To Do With It”


Song of the Year

GRAHAM LYLE & TERRY BRITTEN, “What’s Love Got To Do With It” (Tina Turner)

 

A classic album by Richie and a classic song by Turner. Both sound a little dated now, but you can’t deny their impact.

 

1985:

 

Album of the Year

PHIL COLLINS, No Jacket Required


Record of the Year

QUINCY JONES, producer, “We Are The World”


Song of the Year

MICHAEL JACKSON & LIONEL RICHIE, writers, “We Are The World”

 

No Jacket Required was an album full of hits — songs that still get played today. “We Are The World” was important in its moment even if in reality its an awful song.

 

1986:

Album of the Year:

PAUL SIMON, Graceland

 

Record of the Year:

STEVE WINWOOD, “Higher Love”

 

Song of the Year:

CAROLE BAYER SAGER & BURT BACHARACH, “That’s What Friends Are For” (Dionne Warwick & Friends)

 

Graceland was the capper on Simon’s legendary career and “Higher Love” was a huge comeback for Winwood. Both hold up today. “That’s What Friends Are For,” was (and is) a horrible bit of treacle which somehow captured a moment.

 

1987:

 

Album of the Year:

U2, The Joshua Tree


Record of the Year
:

Paul Simon “Graceland”


Song Of The Year:

Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram. “Somewhere Out There”

 

Simon won for his album last year and the single this one. The only disaster on this list might be Ronstadt and Ingram singing there song from the talking mouse movie.

 

1988:

 

Album of the Year

GEORGE MICHAEL, Faith

 

Record of the Year

BOBBY McFERRIN, “Don’t Worry Be Happy”

 

Song of the Year

BOBBY McFERRIN, “Don’t Worry Be Happy”

 

Michael had a solid career though he never hit these heights again. McFerrin more or less disappeared.

 

1999:

 

Album of the Year

BONNIE RAITT, Nick of Time

 

Record of the Year

BETTE MIDLER, “Wind Beneath My Wings”


Song of the Year

LARRY HENLEY & JEFF SILBAR, “Wind Beneath My Wings”

 

Raitt won for her first real hit album in more of a lifetime achievement fashion while Midler proved that schmlatz always sell.

Some of the winner are obvious — iconic songs which we still love today. Others are more than a little bit perplexing.

 

1980:

Album of the Year
CHRISTOPHER CROSS, Christopher Cross

Record of the Year
CHRISTOPHER CROSS, “Sailing”

Song of the Year

CHRISTOPHER CROSS, “Sailing”

 

It was a clean sweep for Cross who would go on to pretty much never be heard from again.

 

1981:

Album of the Year

JOHN LENNON & YOKO ONO, Double Fantasy

 

Record of the Year

KIM CARNES, “Bette Davis Eyes”

 

Song of the Year

DONNA WEISS & JACKIE DESHANNON, “Bette Davis Eyes” (Kim Carnes)

 

It’s hard to remember that Yoko Ono once actually produced listenable music and this album is an all-time classic. “Bette Davis Eyes” by Kim Carnes may not be quite as much a classic, but it’s still surprisingly catchy.

 

1982:

Album of the Year

TOTO, Toto IV


Record of the Year

TOTO, “Rosanna”


Song of the Year

WAYNE CARSON, MARK JAMES & JOHNNY CHRISTOPHER,

“Always On My Mind” (Willie Nelson)

 

TOTO was a supergroup of sorts which scored a number of hits and IV was the pinnacle of its success (though a version of the group still plays now). Willie Nelson, of course, has been an icon for decades and this may be one of his most widely-known songs which truly holds up.

 

1983:

Album of the Year

MICHAEL JACKSON, Thriller


Record of the Year

MICHAEL JACKSON, “Beat It”


Song of the Year

STING, “Every Breath You Take”

 

This was Michael Jackson at the height of his power (well before we knew what a creep he would turn out to be) and The Police when they were the best band in the world.

 

1984:

Album of the Year

LIONEL RICHIE, Can’t Slow Down


Record of the Year

TINA TURNER, “What’s Love Got To Do With It”


Song of the Year

GRAHAM LYLE & TERRY BRITTEN, “What’s Love Got To Do With It” (Tina Turner)

 

A classic album by Richie and a classic song by Turner. Both sound a little dated now, but you can’t deny their impact.

 

1985:

Album of the Year

PHIL COLLINS, No Jacket Required


Record of the Year

QUINCY JONES, producer, “We Are The World”


Song of the Year

MICHAEL JACKSON & LIONEL RICHIE, writers, “We Are The World”

 

No Jacket Required was an album full of hits — songs that still get played today. “We Are The World” was important in its moment even if in reality its an awful song.

 

1986:

Album of the Year:

PAUL SIMON, Graceland

 

Record of the Year:

STEVE WINWOOD, “Higher Love”

 

Song of the Year:

CAROLE BAYER SAGER & BURT BACHARACH, “That’s What Friends Are For” (Dionne Warwick & Friends)

 

Graceland was the capper on Simon’s legendary career and “Higher Love” was a huge comeback for Winwood. Both hold up today. “That’s What Friends Are For,” was (and is) a horrible bit of treacle which somehow captured a moment.

 

1987:

Album of the Year:

U2, The Joshua Tree


Record of the Year
:

Paul Simon “Graceland”


Song Of The Year:

Linda Ronstadt and James Ingram. “Somewhere Out There”

 

Simon won for his album last year and the single this one. The only disaster on this list might be Ronstadt and Ingram singing there song from the talking mouse movie.

 

1988:

Album of the Year

GEORGE MICHAEL, Faith

 

Record of the Year

BOBBY McFERRIN, “Don’t Worry Be Happy”

 

Song of the Year

BOBBY McFERRIN, “Don’t Worry Be Happy”

 

Michael had a solid career though he never hit these heights again. McFerrin more or less disappeared.

 

1999:

Album of the Year

BONNIE RAITT, Nick of Time

 

Record of the Year

BETTE MIDLER, “Wind Beneath My Wings”


Song of the Year

LARRY HENLEY & JEFF SILBAR, “Wind Beneath My Wings”

 

Raitt won for her first real hit album in more of a lifetime achievement fashion while Midler proved that schmlatz always sell.

 

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Author: Dan

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